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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 278 (some duplicates have been removed)
experiences in israel where she's lived off and on since 2006. this is about an hour and 15 minutes. >> good afternoon, welcome. i'm the director here at the hudson institute, a son sore on islam, democracy, and the future of the islam world which publishing a journal on islamism called "current trends in islamic ideology," which i co-edit with my colleagues ambassador haqqani and eric brown. it's my pleasure to host today's event. its subject is a wonderful new book by my guest, lelya gilbert, and here it is. its title is "saturday people, sunday people: israel through the eyes of a christian so jowrner," and ms. gilbert is here to discuss her book with us. before introducing and turning to the book itself, let me say a few words by way of introduction about herself. she has had a very impressive and varied career, much of it concerned with the arts including music. she has been a song writer and worked extensively with musical groups including an african children's chorus based in uganda and based of uganda and orphans. she passed on her gifts two her two sons, colin and dylan. co
playing a key role in managing israel's overt campaign against iran's nuclear enrichment program. now, let get out on the stage the duo who will be arguing against tonight's resolution the world cannot tolerate iran with a nuclear capability vali nasr and fareed zakaria. [cheers and applause] vali nasr leads john hopkins school of international study, he is one of the world's top exerts in the political and social developments of iran. he is the author of two best- selling books. he sits on the state department's influential board and has served as a senior advisor as recently as 2011 for afghanistan and pakistan. ladies and gentlemen, dean vali nasr. [cheers and applause] now, when you think of provocative conversation on the big foreign policy challenge of the day you have to think about our next debater. his program on cnn is seen in over 200 countries worldwide but he's anything but a talking head on tv. he writes a column for "the washington post" and is the edit or "time" magazine. please welcome back to the munk debate stage journalist fareed zakaria. [cheers and applause] now we're
jets bombed the research center near damascus and five more injured. israel has not commented on the allegations, but the israeli government had warned syria this week that it would not accept any syrian weapons falling into the hands of hezbollah. israelis are concerned about the possibility of a chemical weapons attack. people have been stockpiling gas masks for months. >> i would rather actually use it as a warning sign, by which israel is warning both hezbollah and assad that israel is well aware of what is going on. >> israelis fear for their safety. the air strikes marked an escalation in the conflict. now syria says it reserves the right to retaliate. >> in a separate development, the united nations has accused israel of violating the rights of palestinians by continuing to build settlements on occupied land. the united nations human rights council meeting in geneva called israel's settlement building creeping annexation and called on the country to stop the practice and remove all jewish settlers from the west bank. israel is boycotting the meeting as it accuses the co
israel's overt and covert campaign against iran's nuclear enrichment program. now, let's get out on the stage the equally forbiddable duo who will be orging -- arguing. leading johns hopkins prestigious school. born in tehran one of the world's top experts on the political and social development of iran. and he's the author of two best selling books, the shia revival and democracy on the iran. served as a senior advisor recently as 2011 for afghanistan and pakistan to the late richard holbrook, former munk bedator. now, when you think of provocktiff conversation on the big foreign policy challenges of the day you have to think about our next debator. his flagship global affairs program on cnn is seen in over 200 countries worldwide. but he is anything but a talking head on cable tv. he writes a highly respected column for the "washington post" and is the editor at large of time magazine. his numerous best-selling books include the post american world and the future of freedom. now, we are just moments from getting our debate under way but before we hear opening statements once ag
. >> woodruff: and a margaret warner report about the threat a nuclear-armed iran poses to israel. >> if they accumulate enough uranium which is close to weapons grade, enough uranium which enables them to detonate one nuclear device: to me is clearly a redline. >> brown: former vice president al gore joins us to talk about his new book as well as money politics and the future of democracy. >> the congress is virtually incapable of passing any reforms unless they first get permission from the powerful special interests. >> woodruff: do americans trust the federal government? andrew kohut says a new pew poll shows the majority do not. >> brown: and ray suarez gets the latest on the chinese hackers who allegedly mounted a four-month cyber-attack against the "new york times." that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy
to israel to nuclear weapons. >> no one individual vote, no one individual quote, no one individual statement defines me, my beliefs, or my record. my overall world view has never changed: that america has and must maintain the strongest military in the world. >> i believe, and always have, that america must engage, not retreat, in the world, but engage in the world. my record is consistent on these points. >> woodruff: but as a nebraska senator, in 2007, hagel angered fellow republicans when he opposed the surge of u.s. troops into iraq. today, his former close friend, arizona senator john mccain made clear, they haven't forgotten. >> were you correct or incorrect when you said that the surge would be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam? were you correct or incorrect, yes or no? >> my reference to the surge being the most dangerous. >> are you going to answer the question, senator hagel? the question is were you right or wrong? that's a pretty straightforward question. i would like an answer on whether you were right or wrong, then you're free to
israel margaret warner reports on fears of islamic militants and chemical weapons just overr thee border. >> warner: with conflict raging inside syria, israel's taking no chances. it's now fortifying the security barrier behind me to guard against any dangers that may arise. >> ifill: and from mali, lindsay hilsum has a story of celebration as french and local forces push north to capture two key towns. >> reporter: look at these people. just thrilled because they can dance. they can sing. the women can ride motor bikes. they can do all the things they haven't been able to do for the last nine months while the jihadis have been in power. >> woodruff: we close with a new edition of the daily download. tonight, can your facebook postings get you fired? >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by moving our economfor 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connec us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the o
israel margaret warner reports on fears of islamic militants and chemical weapons just over the border. >> warner: with conflict raging inside syria israel's taking no chances. it's now fortifying the security barrier behind me to guard against any dangers that may arise. >> ifill: and from mali lindsay hilsum has a story of celebration as french and local forces push north to capture two key towns. >> reporter: look at these people. just thrilled because they can dance. they can sing. the women can ride motor bikes. they can do all the things they haven't been able to do for the last nine months while the jihadis have been in power. >> woodruff: we close with a new edition of the daily download. tonight, can your facebook postings get you fired? >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the
with the financial times, thanks so much for talking to us. >> ifill: next, to israel. president obama called prime minister benjamin netanyahu today to congratulate him on his victory in last week's parliamentary elections. the two leaders spoke about ensuring security in the region at a time of growing tensions. with their elections behind them, both men plan to address the civil war in syria, the threat posed by iran's nuclear program, and the stalemate between israelis and palestinians. and those are the subjects of three stories this week from margaret warner who is on a reporting trip to israel, the west bank and gaza. she begins tonight reporting on israeli concerns about the conflict in nearby syria. >> warner: the sweeping vistas of the golan heights plateau and the bucolic life of the israelis who live here bear quiet witness to the strategic importance of this area which israel captured from syria during the 1967 arab-israeli war. but after four decades of quiet along this border, israel, just like syria's arab neighbors, is increasingly worried about the unpredictable spillover from the
in the region who all border syria, turkey, jordan, israel, also lebanon. and the potential for a sectarian divide between shiites and sunnis that could spread from syria, exacerbate the tensions that are already there in iraq and then down to the gulf. >> you have the arab revolution's lead to now the rise of these islamist authoritarian governments. what are the consequences of that? in syria you talk about al qaeda presence. it's unlikely an al qaeda affiliated group will take over syria or egypt. greater likelihood perhaps in egypt and not even there. what is american influence look like -- what should it look like in this post revolutionary period when there was so much excitement about the prospect of egyptian democracy taking root in way that would be in concert with the u.s. at a time when there are people very critical of the o bama administration for essentially getting out of the way, letting the revolution happen and then turning their backs on the likes of mubarak who could have at least guaranteed some level of stability? >> i think it was an illusion to imagine that we could
of the coming death, burial and resurrection of israel's messiah. "he was the priest of (jehovah? no it doesn't say that? but what?) the most high god." now we have to realize there is only one god in scripture but there are many names for him and that confuses people. but you see, we have all these different names of god to signify a particular role in his being god. in his attributes. and so for example, when abraham was going to sacrifice isaac and god withheld him. what was in the thicket behind him? well, the ram! who put it there? god did! and i always emphasize, you see, that ram was a wild ram. he was already three days journey from where he lived, so it was not a household pet like somebody tried to tell me one time. he was three days journey from home, so that ram in the thicket was not the family pet, it was a wild one. but, did abraham and isaac have any trouble getting that animal on the altar? none. why? it was provided and it was docile. and it was a willing sacrifice. they didn't have to struggle with it and consequently what did abraham call the place? jehovah-jireh which sim
minr of israel. mr. prime minister, welcome. nice to see you. long time no see. what was your reaction when you heard morsi's hateful words? >> well, good evening. i think these are certainly obnoxious expressions. it's certainly raising serious questions about the attitude of this person. i hope that while he's now president of egypt that he will understand the responsibility of this part of his job and the effect that this has on relations between israel and egypt and he has to adjust himself to the realities of the relations that existed for the last 30 years between israel and egypt. >> his statements were ugly, his tone ugly, the words he chose to use anti-semitic and racist, and yet they show a great frustration with the israeli-arab peace, the status of the two-state negotiations. it appears, doesn't it to you, prime minister, that we get further and further away from mid yeast peace with every day, every week, every month, every year that passes? >> nothing that develops -- or that does not develop in the context of the relations between israel and the palestinians justifies wh
people this way. >> cenk: it's really interesting because on the other hand israel seems to be fairly happy with him, so are we. we send in more aid and military weapons to help him. that's something you might not necessarily expect. he's deep muslim brotherhood in domestic policies of egypt, but externally seems to be saying the right things. >> externally he has not rocked the boat. i think washington and tel aviv want him not to rock the boat, so they're treating him with kid gloves in a way. but i i think he did put enormous pressure on benjamin netanyahu not to send troops into gaza. he is an ambiguous figure with regard to washington and israel. they're suspicious of him. they're caution, cautious, but he's all they got the only legitimate force in egypt. now he's undermining his legitimacy with these emergency decrees and so forth. >> cenk: then we go to an organization called black block which is not much of an organization because they have no chain of command. let me have "time" magazine describe it a little bit for you. they boast that they're willing to use force against i
concerned about sending f-16s to egypt would be israel. where are the pro israel lobbies on these -- >> it's quite interesting. i've talked to a lot of the -- a lot of people think there's only one pro israel lobby. there's one dominant one but there's many others, and also members of these groups, and i guarantee if i went to any of their general membership meetings, the pro israel americans are with me on this issue. but they need to call their leadership because many of your pro israel groups are lobbying against me in washington. they're lobbying for sending weapons to a country that very well could be an enemy of egypt -- i mean an enemy of israel and has been an enemy of israel, and i think if they're membership knew these people were up here conspiring in washington to send more weapons to egypt, and then israel has to have then more weapons times two, i think most pro israel americans would be upset to offend out the lobbying groups are lobbying against israel's best interests. >> the one i'm thinking of is ai pac. they were in favor of these going to egypt? >> you better ask them
conclude with a look at two recent elections in the middle east, one in jordan and one in israel. we talk with jordan's ambassador to the united nations prince bin ra'ad and efraim halevy. >> when we first heard the rumblings of the arab spring some may have thought that thises with a train that was passing through the station in and out. i think his majesty understood full well that these were seismic rumblings. and the region has had for a long time been bereft of real reforms. his majesty began earlier on. and i think you know now felt that for those who had a vested interest in the stat usco, this is their time to understand-- status quo, this is their time to understand something is changing. >> there is something much more deep that going to happen in the months to am come and there have before been a few indications of this in the last 48 hoursment and that is that the problem of the relationship between religion and state between those who are orthodox and trawl orthodox and those who are to a large extent secular, how to create a society in which you have common aims, common beli
in the iran nuclear showdown as the rogue nation backs up serious threats to retaliate against israel. a very busy 24, 48 hours we'll tell you about it. randy travis's trouble with the law. could the country music star wind up spending serious time behind bars? it he is all "happening now." jenna: not a flattering mug shot of randy travis, that shot, right? jon: not something you put on an album cover. jenna: we'll have the latest. our big story, happening now the president's pick to lead the pentagon is facing his critics. i'm jenna lee. jon: good to have you back after a week away. jenna: hope you missed me desperately. jon: yes we did. i'm jon scott. whether chuck hagel will be confirmed as defense secretary the republican taking questions from his former colleagues on the senate armed services committee. many in his own party criticizing him ever sips his nomination was announced saying is not sufficiently pro-israel and he needs to be. he is criticized for his quotes on the jewish lobby and gay rights. no matter what he said in the past his world view has stayed the same. >> my overall w
in that part of the world, israel. lou: the reason we continue to fund this government, to, to continue the policies of which egypt is simply a part, libya as well, the distance from which we have remained from events in syria, without a clear-cut policy, what are your thoughts? >> well, the syrian situation has now become much more serious simply because we now have evidence that the assad regime is moving the precursors and chemical agents to places we may not be able to deal with. nato took a look at it today, lou and said nato will do something about it. as you and i donate toe is toothless to do anything about it without the united states. and it could take upwards of above 50,000 troops to secure those chemical munitions, weapons of mass destruction that threaten not only the people inside syria but also the neighborhood to include turkey. thus the need for those, patriot missiles coming over. lou: right. are you surprised that we're sending patriot missiles, defense systems to, to the turks? >> no. in fact this has been hanging fire in brussels now for some months. the turks have
living in israel should come back to egypt. >> these words were said in a specific context and the one who said it, said it in this way to demonstrate what he wanted to say from his point of view. but there are many media outlets that removed it from the general context. however, he is no longer an adviser to me because now he is a member of the legislative counsel in the sharia counsel, it is not right to group the legislative counsel and the executive counsel together in this stage because he is not my adviser now. >> reporter: cnn correspondent ian lee has been there for several years, and speaks arabic. he says there are serious divisions in the country. so talk about this. >> on one side you have the legislation, it has been disorganized. they seem to have somewhat of an organization. and on the other side you have the muslim brotherhood, you have the ultraconservative salafis. you have two camps, both sides, who believe they're right. both sides trying for power. >> reporter: one expert says the future of egypt will largely depend on the economy. and we're watching it obviously c
a situation in israel which hundreds of thousands of israelis do not have a personal status in the country. >> rose: change in syria, israel and jordan when we continue. >> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following. >>> a polar bear cub is born with no sense of sight. we are a decisional funding provided by these funders. >> and by bloomberg a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. from our studios in new york city this is dharl charlie rose. >> the arab spring reached syria nearly two years ago when residents of a small southern city protested the government's tover ture of students. today those protests erupted into one of the post deadly civil yars in syrian history. over 400,000 refugees have fled the war-torn country, opposition remains fragmented and in some cases disorganized but as the violence escalates, the international community may have to decide when and how to intervene am joining me cbs news correspondent clarissa ward. she has spent much of the past year reporting from inside sirria. she is one of the only journalists to tell this stor
in 1981. and most recently, up until 2010, playing a key role in managing israel's overt and covert campaign against iran's nuclear enrichment program. ladies and gentlemen, major general retired adlin. [applause] now, let's get out on the stage the equal request formidable duo who will be arguing against tonight's resolution, be it resolved the world cannot tolerate an iran with nuclear weapons capability. vali nasser and fareed zakaria. [applause] well, dean vali nasser leads john hopkins university's press contingentous school of advanced international studies, born in tehran, he's one of the world's top experts on the political and social developments of iran. and he's the author of two best-selling books, "the shi'a revival" and "democracy in iran." he sits on the state department's influential foreign affairs policy board and has served as a senior advisor as recently as 2011 for afghanistan and pakistan to the late richard holbrook, a former munk debater. ladies and gentlemen, dean vali nasser. [applause] now, when you think of provocative conversation on a big foreign policy
agencies here in israel and we have talked to a few of them is that this particular research facility has been a facility that they know has been part of a chain of facilities that syria runs that have been trying to create unconventional weaponry. we are talking chemical weapons. however we are told this particular facility didn't have chemical weapons in it. however it was in a link. something that would help them move, for example, weaponry around. this facility we are hearing from intelligent sources was one in which very large missiles were made to be smaller so they could be transported. that is the key here. a lot of worry in israel that the weapons in syria are being transported across the border to lebanon into the hands of hezbollah which is a known enemy of israel. >> real quick here, sara. do we know if the syrians are threatening now to retaliate? >> they have given some inkling that it was unacceptable, b barbaric as they put it. we are not hearing the heightened language you often here targeted at israel. we heard it from iran. iran basically saying through their media that
statements is made on israel and the united states, that our policy of non-engagement with the syrians as, "isolated us more than the syrians," and a 2009 statement that "we should not isolate hamas," a terrorist organization. there is much to be explored at this hearing. but as we struggle with the difficult security challenges facing our nation, the president needs to have a secretary of trust,e in whom he has stresse who will give him unvarnished advice, a person of integrity, and one who has a personal understanding of the consequences of decisions relative to the use of military force. senator hagel certainly has those critically important qualifications to lead the department of defense. senator inhofe. >> thank you, mr. chairman. first of all, i would like to echo your remarks about secretary panetta and the work he has done. i don't see him here today, but i do recall that when he was first nominated, i was probably one of the first phone calls to him, and i have enjoyed working with him and a mccain, the same way, i continue to depend on his counsel. you and i have worked very we
these publics most intensely of grievances, including grievances against the united states and israel and most importantly against their own unrepresentative pro-western government in regime. amendment the islamic republic has done is aligned itself with public opinion at south in the middle east to constrain hostile governments from attacking a. just think about how barbering largely shia population would react to the fleetest our fifth fleet based in bahrain to attack the islamic republic today. u.s. military planners could hope that the iran's population would be passive as they think they assumed maybe even five years ago. but today it clearly seems reckless. for other ridiculing many american policy elites do with the islamic republic, the appeal to regional public actually works. it works to constrain the united states and hostile, unrepresentative pro-western neighboring iran. iran is also the two reinforce these aspects of a software strategy of a number of years at picking what we would call winners, zero, hamas, hezbollah, shia groups, even the muslim brotherhood political ally and k
into egypt, threaten israel. there were very important reasons why we were there, not just the state department, but other government agencies. whether or when we go back will depend upon the security situation. >> all of that and much more ahead. but first, on the heels of president obama blasting rush limbaugh and fox news, democratic senator mary landrieu taking a shot of her own at fox. >> i am not going to keep cutting the discretionary budget, which by the way, is not out of control, despite what you hear on fox news. >> so is this trend going to continue? what do they get out of it? former speaker of the house, newt gingrich is here. at least president obama and senator landrieu put the straw man up there, apparently, fox news is their straw man. >> they're very different arguments. mary landrieu's argument, with all due respect is nuts. the idea that discretionary spending's not too high, the idea that this government's not too big, the idea that the deficit isn't too large, this is not a fox news problem, this is a wash politician problem. i think they can try to find somebo
. in a few moments, a look at how the u.s. and israel should respond to the nuclear program. a forum on polling and the presidential election. a focus on the debate for aids and victims of hurricane sandy. >> i tend to flip over to the senate every now and again, especially if there is something important going on. coverage of the floor. the c-span has it. i even listen to c-span radio in my car sometimes if it is there. >> c-span, treated by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public-service by your television provider. now, a forum on iran's nuclear program. this debate includes a look at u.s. and israel policy in the middle east. ♪ >> i never heard such a stupid thing. [laughter] [indiscernible] >> then you have to come back and you are shaken up. >> i have yet to hear a serious argument from either of these two. no, no, you have had your say. >> you have got to say something. >> i am not prepared to sacrifice for some free market ideology. ♪ >> we are all in this. running a trade surplus unless we can find another to sell to. >> we remain on like japan. the
of israel tonight. this, as the united states is providing a gift to egypt and muslim brotherhood member, president of e jupt, morsi. four f [laughter] 16 fighter jets left the country for egypt today part of a foreign aid package including 200 abe brame's tanks, and urged urged -- joining us now is andrew mccarthy, former federal prosecutor, convicted the blind shake, and he's also author ever the book "spring fever. illusion of islamic democracy," andrew, great to have you with us. start with, first, these developments. sending this aid to egypt at this point, and it is significant aid. there should be no misunderstanding about that. these have f-16s, 200abrhams's tanks, powerful weapons of war. >> a deal, lou, made back in 2010 with the mubarak regime committed to keeping the base with israel. it's now turned over to a regime that's committed to the destruction of israel, notwithstanding what they say, and a regime which is part of the global movement, the muslim brotherhood that the justice department proved in u.s. court in 2008 is committed to the, as they said, the elimination and
for refusing to let the men forced the law. nationalize council is also here. and israel unilaterally attacking key syrian assets and an overnight bombing. former pentagon official is also our guest tonight. would you want to begin with the u.s. economy shocking the experts in shrinking for the first time since the recession. fox news iran house correspondent has our report. >> less than two weeks that the president said his second inaugural address that an economic recovery had begun to let the congress -- commerce departments and not so fast. slow growth slashed economic growth from three pa 1% to-1 to the persons in the fourth. they downplayed the report and give republicans part of the blame. >> consumer spending has been rising. >> comments about using the threat of across-the-board spending cuts not as a sequestered for leveraged for fiscal asperity. some members constituents are fighting. >> and put the damage on the economy as a -- you know, to achieve some political roles here in washington seems like a bad idea. >> accusing republicans of pushing spending cuts for their own sake. some
of israel has been lacking, and that he has not been tough enough on iran. they point to his comments, once describing apac, the leading pro-israel lobby, as the jewish lobby. and also to his lack support for unilateral sanctions against iran. but here at the white house, they're pointing to his support for sanctions from the u.s. as well as its allies, together, forming sanctions against iran. this is something president obama referenced today in the east room. >> he understands that america stands strongest when we stand with allies. and with friends. as a successful businessman, he also knows that even as we make tough fiscal choices, we have to do so wisely. and keep our military the strongest fighting force the world has ever known. maybe most importantly, chuck knows that war is not an obstructi obstruction. he understands that sending young americans to fight and bleed in the dirt and mud, that's something we only do when it's absolutely necessary. >> the president stressed hagel's experience as an enlisted soldier in vietnam. hagel would be the first secretary of defense to have bee
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 278 (some duplicates have been removed)